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Expansion pitched for Middleton’s Soldiers Memorial Hospital

Soldiers Memorial Hospital in Middleton.
Soldiers Memorial Hospital in Middleton.

MIDDLETON - The Soldiers Memorial Hospital Foundation is pushing to have the hospital and a collaborative care medical clinic under one roof.

In March 2015, the foundation committed to providing up to $1 million, or 25 per cent of the cost, for an expansion at Soldiers Memorial that would include a primary care medical centre. The foundation’s financial commitment is contingent on the provincial government covering the remaining costs.

The foundation’s annual directors’ report dated for June 2015 to June 2016 indicates that the directors were privy to a presentation about the conceptual design for the new medical centre on April 18, but the provincial Department of Health and Wellness has yet to commit to the project.

Hospital foundation spokesperson Jim Mosher confirmed on July 4 that the project remains in the preliminary stages, with no formal approvals received.

“One of the reasons why we would get into it would be to stabilize our doctor situation,” he said, noting that the collaborative model that puts doctors, nurses, dietitians and physiotherapists in one clinic is seen as the way of the future.

“We would hope that this would entice more doctors to come here and we’re doing quite well lately with the training program out of Dalhousie.”

The collaborative model allows primary care professionals to better share the workload, Mosher said.

“You see the one that’s most appropriate for your condition,” he said.

Nova Scotia Health Authority spokesperson Deidre Taylor said the proposal was developed with the Middleton Collaborative Practice team in mind.

“An initial schematic design has been completed for this proposal. A business case was submitted to the Department of Health and Wellness for further detailed design and capital construction, along with other NSHA capital projects,” said Taylor.

“This new space has been proposed for the team to address accessibility for patients, as well as to have additional practice space to accommodate the full team and other health professionals, including residents/learners, for example. The new space will also support recruitment and retention of health care providers, including family doctors to the community.”

A time frame for a detailed design and construction would not be completed until the necessary funding is secured, Taylor said.

 

In March 2015, the foundation committed to providing up to $1 million, or 25 per cent of the cost, for an expansion at Soldiers Memorial that would include a primary care medical centre. The foundation’s financial commitment is contingent on the provincial government covering the remaining costs.

The foundation’s annual directors’ report dated for June 2015 to June 2016 indicates that the directors were privy to a presentation about the conceptual design for the new medical centre on April 18, but the provincial Department of Health and Wellness has yet to commit to the project.

Hospital foundation spokesperson Jim Mosher confirmed on July 4 that the project remains in the preliminary stages, with no formal approvals received.

“One of the reasons why we would get into it would be to stabilize our doctor situation,” he said, noting that the collaborative model that puts doctors, nurses, dietitians and physiotherapists in one clinic is seen as the way of the future.

“We would hope that this would entice more doctors to come here and we’re doing quite well lately with the training program out of Dalhousie.”

The collaborative model allows primary care professionals to better share the workload, Mosher said.

“You see the one that’s most appropriate for your condition,” he said.

Nova Scotia Health Authority spokesperson Deidre Taylor said the proposal was developed with the Middleton Collaborative Practice team in mind.

“An initial schematic design has been completed for this proposal. A business case was submitted to the Department of Health and Wellness for further detailed design and capital construction, along with other NSHA capital projects,” said Taylor.

“This new space has been proposed for the team to address accessibility for patients, as well as to have additional practice space to accommodate the full team and other health professionals, including residents/learners, for example. The new space will also support recruitment and retention of health care providers, including family doctors to the community.”

A time frame for a detailed design and construction would not be completed until the necessary funding is secured, Taylor said.

 

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