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Middleton goalball athlete heads to World Games

Cheryl Johnson and Midge Medicraft, on behalf of the Mayflower and Annavale chapters of the Order of the Eastern Star, present Mason Smith with a $100 cheque for travel expenses. Smith is representing the country  at the World Games in Colorado.
Cheryl Johnson and Midge Medicraft, on behalf of the Mayflower and Annavale chapters of the Order of the Eastern Star, present Mason Smith with a $100 cheque for travel expenses. Smith is representing the country at the World Games in Colorado.

MIDDLETON. A Middleton Regional High School goalball player is one of two Nova Scotians representing the country at the World Youth Games in Colorado.

Mason Smith, of Middleton, and Tarah Sawler, of Dartmouth, are the first two Nova Scotians ever to make the Canadian junior goalball national boys and girls teams.  

They are representing Canada at the International Blind Sports Association's (IBSA) World Youth Games being held in Colorado Springs, Colorado from July 28th to the 31st. 

The Annavale and Mayflower chapters of the Order of the Eastern Star recently presented Mason with a $100 cheque to help offset some of his travel costs.

“Mason is a 15 year-old young man who loves sports and has excelled at goalball,” says Midge Medicraft, of Annavale Chapter. “Mason has only played this game for about six months and already has two gold medals for it.”

Mason has won both junior and senior mens’ national titles this season and has been named to the junior boys national team in just his first year of goalball.

He is active in other sports, according to Medicraft including hockey, soccer, rugby and track and field.

Tarah Sawler, 16, led the Nova Scotia junior girls to the bronze medal at the junior nationals in Brantford, ON in March.  She is in her second year of goalball and also plays for the Nova Scotia Senior Women's¹ team.

Linda MacRae Triff from Dartmouth was selected by the Canadian Blind Sports Association (CBSA) to coach the junior boys national team at this year¹s tournament.  

Nova Scotia men's goalball athlete and junior assistant coach, Peter Parsons from Halifax will be the assistant coach for the Canadian junior boys and girls teams.  

Goalball is a Paralympic sport that was created after WWII for blinded veterans. It is a team sport played by athletes who are blind or visually impaired.  

Played on a volleyball sized court on a gym floor with goals at either end spanning the entire back line, two teams of three players compete by throwing a ball along the floor and into the opposite team¹s goal.  

The opposing team attempts to physically block the ball from crossing the goal line. Because players can have different levels of vision, all participants are blindfolded to create a level playing field as they listen for the goalball, which has bells in it.

 

Mason Smith, of Middleton, and Tarah Sawler, of Dartmouth, are the first two Nova Scotians ever to make the Canadian junior goalball national boys and girls teams.  

They are representing Canada at the International Blind Sports Association's (IBSA) World Youth Games being held in Colorado Springs, Colorado from July 28th to the 31st. 

The Annavale and Mayflower chapters of the Order of the Eastern Star recently presented Mason with a $100 cheque to help offset some of his travel costs.

“Mason is a 15 year-old young man who loves sports and has excelled at goalball,” says Midge Medicraft, of Annavale Chapter. “Mason has only played this game for about six months and already has two gold medals for it.”

Mason has won both junior and senior mens’ national titles this season and has been named to the junior boys national team in just his first year of goalball.

He is active in other sports, according to Medicraft including hockey, soccer, rugby and track and field.

Tarah Sawler, 16, led the Nova Scotia junior girls to the bronze medal at the junior nationals in Brantford, ON in March.  She is in her second year of goalball and also plays for the Nova Scotia Senior Women's¹ team.

Linda MacRae Triff from Dartmouth was selected by the Canadian Blind Sports Association (CBSA) to coach the junior boys national team at this year¹s tournament.  

Nova Scotia men's goalball athlete and junior assistant coach, Peter Parsons from Halifax will be the assistant coach for the Canadian junior boys and girls teams.  

Goalball is a Paralympic sport that was created after WWII for blinded veterans. It is a team sport played by athletes who are blind or visually impaired.  

Played on a volleyball sized court on a gym floor with goals at either end spanning the entire back line, two teams of three players compete by throwing a ball along the floor and into the opposite team¹s goal.  

The opposing team attempts to physically block the ball from crossing the goal line. Because players can have different levels of vision, all participants are blindfolded to create a level playing field as they listen for the goalball, which has bells in it.

 

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