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Lawrencetown’s George Grant honoured by Veterans Affairs Minister Hehr

George Grant of Lawrencetown was presented with the ‘Minister of Veterans Affairs Commendation’ at a ceremony in Halifax on July 25. It is “...awarded to individuals who have performed commendable service to the veteran community or individuals who represent commendable role models for their fellow veterans.”
George Grant of Lawrencetown was presented with the ‘Minister of Veterans Affairs Commendation’ at a ceremony in Halifax on July 25. It is “...awarded to individuals who have performed commendable service to the veteran community or individuals who represent commendable role models for their fellow veterans.”

LAWRENCETOWN - George Grant has been helping Canadian military veterans for years. On July 25 Minister of Veterans Affairs Kent Hehr thanked him in person.

Grant was one of eight people honoured by the minister in a ceremony in Halifax. The Lawrencetown resident was presented with the ‘Minister of Veterans Affairs Commendation’ for his contributions in the service of Canada’s veterans.

Grant spent 28 years in the military himself signing on for Korea and spending years as a United Nations Peacekeeper in places like the Belgian Congo, Cyprus, and Egypt. He knows first-hand what Canadian soldiers have been through and has committed himself to assisting veterans in any way he can.

“The individuals recognized today have provided immeasurable contributions to the well-being of Canada’s veterans,” said Hehr, who is also associate Minister of National Defence. “I applaud their dedication and devotion in proudly serving our veterans. Their work leaves a positive impact in our communities to allow for the greatest levels of care we can provide.”

 

Service

Grant, who is 80 years old, only became a Royal Canadian Legion member in 2005, but has sat on the executive for most of those years, including serving as sergeant-at-arms, zone service officer, and for three years as president. Already he’s a life member of the Royal Canadian Legion.

Currently he is the Service Officer at the Lawrencetown Royal Canadian Legion, a role he has served for the past 10 years. As Service Officer he assists veterans with their benefits requests.

And he also makes a weekly visit to veterans at the Soldiers Memorial Hospital, in Middleton, bringing cards for special occasions, organizing celebrations, and taking time to visit with them. He has arranged several memorial services, making sure those ceremonies took place where veterans in the hospital, who are unable to attend, could look out their windows and observe the proceedings.

He has also been heavily involved with the organization of many commemorative ceremonies, including Remembrance Day ceremonies. Plus he’s been active with the Poppy Fund and makes multiple visits every year to a local school.

Grant was one of eight people honoured by the minister in a ceremony in Halifax. The Lawrencetown resident was presented with the ‘Minister of Veterans Affairs Commendation’ for his contributions in the service of Canada’s veterans.

Grant spent 28 years in the military himself signing on for Korea and spending years as a United Nations Peacekeeper in places like the Belgian Congo, Cyprus, and Egypt. He knows first-hand what Canadian soldiers have been through and has committed himself to assisting veterans in any way he can.

“The individuals recognized today have provided immeasurable contributions to the well-being of Canada’s veterans,” said Hehr, who is also associate Minister of National Defence. “I applaud their dedication and devotion in proudly serving our veterans. Their work leaves a positive impact in our communities to allow for the greatest levels of care we can provide.”

 

Service

Grant, who is 80 years old, only became a Royal Canadian Legion member in 2005, but has sat on the executive for most of those years, including serving as sergeant-at-arms, zone service officer, and for three years as president. Already he’s a life member of the Royal Canadian Legion.

Currently he is the Service Officer at the Lawrencetown Royal Canadian Legion, a role he has served for the past 10 years. As Service Officer he assists veterans with their benefits requests.

And he also makes a weekly visit to veterans at the Soldiers Memorial Hospital, in Middleton, bringing cards for special occasions, organizing celebrations, and taking time to visit with them. He has arranged several memorial services, making sure those ceremonies took place where veterans in the hospital, who are unable to attend, could look out their windows and observe the proceedings.

He has also been heavily involved with the organization of many commemorative ceremonies, including Remembrance Day ceremonies. Plus he’s been active with the Poppy Fund and makes multiple visits every year to a local school.

A lapel pin for civilian wear, and a bar for wear with decorations, were presented with the commendation to George Grant by Minister of Veterans Affairs Kent Hehr July 25 in Halifax.

Also Honoured

Besides Grant, other Nova Scotians honoured at the July 25 ceremony were Darryl Cook, Bridgewater, Arnold Robert Garron, Yarmouth, Debbie Lowther, Dartmouth, Joseph S. Savoy, Sydney, and Michael Simmons, Pictou. Edward A. Oursien and Carl Scovil, both of New Brunswick, were also honoured.

A media release described those honoured:

“Through their efforts, these citizens provide invaluable support to the veteran community,” the release said, “promoting greater awareness of the sacrifices and achievements of Canada’s veterans and dedicating themselves to Veteran care.

 

Quick Facts

-- The Minister of Veterans Affairs Commendation was created in 2001 by Warrant of the Governor General and with the approval of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II.

-- The governing policies call for it to be “...awarded to individuals who have performed commendable service to the veteran community or individuals who represent commendable role models for their fellow veterans.”

-- The commendation consists of a certificate, a lapel pin for civilian wear, and a bar for wear with decorations.

-- The design is a gold maple leaf resting on a red poppy, a flower long associated with the sacrifices of war, with the Royal Crown on the top of the pin.

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