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Memory Lane Railway Museum in Middleton will soon close after decades of showing off the age of trains. Terry Hyson has been with the museum since the beginning. The old train station is filled with an extensive collection of Dominion Atlantic Railway memorabilia and a collection of vintage items such as old farm tools, model railways, historical books, and manuscripts.
Memory Lane Railway Museum in Middleton will soon close after decades of showing off the age of trains. Terry Hyson has been with the museum since the beginning. The old train station is filled with an extensive collection of Dominion Atlantic Railway memorabilia and a collection of vintage items such as old farm tools, model railways, historical books, and manuscripts.

MIDDLETON - Unless new volunteers come aboard to help run the Memory Lane Railway Museum, the place will close later this year.

This was no ordinary train, though.

Andy's Rainbow Park is now home to a handcrafted wooden train for children to play on.

The 24-foot structure came to Port aux Basques courtesy of the Lions Club and Helen and Chester Coffin. The park is named for the Coffins' son.

The idea for the train originated with the Lions Club, which was looking for a legacy project to give back to the community.

Members approached the Coffins with idea, and the family raised money to purchase materials.

The train itself was built by inmates at the Bishop's Falls Correctional Centre, and arrived in Port aux Basques at the end of September.

The Lions approached a shipping company to bring the train to Port aux Basques, and the company donated the associated costs.

On Oct. 4, there were already groups of children admiring the new train and crawling through the different cars.

Helen Coffin said a plaque will be placed on the train soon in memory of Andy.

bryan.tait@tc.tc

This was no ordinary train, though.

Andy's Rainbow Park is now home to a handcrafted wooden train for children to play on.

The 24-foot structure came to Port aux Basques courtesy of the Lions Club and Helen and Chester Coffin. The park is named for the Coffins' son.

The idea for the train originated with the Lions Club, which was looking for a legacy project to give back to the community.

Members approached the Coffins with idea, and the family raised money to purchase materials.

The train itself was built by inmates at the Bishop's Falls Correctional Centre, and arrived in Port aux Basques at the end of September.

The Lions approached a shipping company to bring the train to Port aux Basques, and the company donated the associated costs.

On Oct. 4, there were already groups of children admiring the new train and crawling through the different cars.

Helen Coffin said a plaque will be placed on the train soon in memory of Andy.

bryan.tait@tc.tc

Helen and Chester Coffin were joined by friends, family and members of the Port aux Basques Lions Club at Andy's Rainbow Park to take a look at the train that was added to the playground.

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