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East Kings Chess Club is reinventing itself in Wolfville

Jonas Dornieden, right, plays three other players at once during a session of the newly vitalized East Kings Chess Club.
Jonas Dornieden, right, plays three other players at once during a session of the newly vitalized East Kings Chess Club.

WOLFVILLE, NS – There used to be an active East Kings Chess Club. It was going strong 20 years ago. This month the club got going again.  

“We have started meeting regularly in the Wolfville Memorial Library on Mondays 6.30 - 9.00 p.m.,” says Ralf Dornieden. “Everybody is welcome.”
Dornieden understands the previous club had a great reputation. It was also situated in the upstairs of the library.
“They played tournaments and games all over the province, including the Bluenose Chess Club in Halfax. We want to start this club again,” he said, “especially during the fall - spring season it’s a nice game to play.
The father of three thinks chess is a great way to get people off the computer and let them play face to face. Ian Anderson and Joe Pero agree.
Anderson says chess teaches patience, strategic thinking and prioritization.
“You learn to use your brain yourself,” he added. “Canadians are too into iPhones. In England they have 900 chess clubs. Internationally there are 600 million chess players. In North America we stopped playing.”
According to the Nova Scotia Chess Federation, clubs exist in western Annapolis County, Bridgewater, Sydney and Halifax. There is a junior club in Dartmouth.

Did you know?
Chess is one of the oldest games. It was invented in the 6th century. The game was used as a form of training by Indian nobility as a form of recreation and by generals of the time who used it to develop military tactics and train future commanders.
Chess was used as a training tool for years up until 1850 when the first modern chess tournament was held in London. It wasn’t until the 20th century that chess really began to catch on worldwide as a serious sporting endeavour.
As chess world champions began to emerge across the globe more research was done into the effects of playing chess. Research showed that chess is one of the easiest and best brain tools around.
If chess is played on a regular basis it can help improve students’ memory, reading skills, increase their creativity and problem solving skills, as well as teaching foresight and future planning.


 

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